BEST photos of flowers from my Wild-Garden in 2016

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Find below, please my BEST photos from my Wild-Garden in 2016 and will get updated as soon as there is NEW stuff 😉

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Stay tuned for next photos 😉
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Sempervivum

Gardening: The Wild-Garden | Names Of The Flowers | Sempervivum | Houseleeks

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Text from Wikipedia: Sempervivum /sɛmpəˈvvəm/,[1] is a genus of about 40 species of flowering plants in the Crassulaceae family, known as houseleeks. Other common names include liveforever and hen and chicks. They are succulent perennials forming mats composed of tufted leaves in rosettes. In favourable conditions they spread rapidly via offsets, and several species are valued in cultivation as groundcover for dry, sunny spots.[2]

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Lunaria annua

My Wild Garden | Panorama View With Localisation Of The Flowers

. My Wild-Garden / ThingLink

Click the above image where YOU will get direct to “ThingLink“. YOU will see an interactive image, move YOUR mouse pointer over the image and YOU will see some spots. These spots are showing which flowers are on what place and by clicking on those spots YOU can access more info about the flowers.

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Gardening: The Wild-Garden | Names Of The Flowers | Rudbeckia hirta | Black-eyed Susan

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Text from Wikipedia: Rudbeckia hirta, commonly called black-eyed Susan, is a species of flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to the Eastern and Central United States. It is one of a number of plants with the common name black-eyed Susan. Other common names for this plant include: brown-eyed Susan, brown Betty, gloriosa daisy, golden Jerusalem,[1][2] Poorland daisy, yellow daisy, and yellow ox-eye daisy.
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Lunaria annua

Gardening: The Wild-Garden | Names Of The Flowers | Lunaria annua

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Text from Wikipedia: Lunaria annua, called honesty or annual honesty in English, is a species of flowering plant native to the Balkans and south west Asia, and naturalized throughout the temperate world.

It is an annual or biennial growing to 90 cm (35 in) tall by 30 cm (12 in) broad, with large, coarse, pointed oval leaves with marked serrations. In spring and summer it bears terminal racemes of white or violet flowers, followed by showy, light brown, translucent, disc-shaped seedpods (silicles) the skin of which falls off to release the seeds, revealing a central membrane which is white with a silvery sheen, 3–8 cm (1–3 in) in diameter; they persist on the plant through winter.[1] These pods are much used in floral arrangements.

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Well, Wikipedia says ===> 90 cm <===! In my Wild-Garden I got one that on 15.07.2014 is already about 1.32 m high!!!

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Lunaria annua

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Iris versicolor | Northern Blue Flag Iris

Gardening: The Wild-Garden | Names Of The Flowers | Iris versicolor | Northern Blue Flag Iris

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[Start text from Wikipedia] Iris versicolor, also commonly known as the Blue flagHarlequin BlueflagLarger Blue Flag,Northern Blue Flag, and other variations of those names, is a species of Iris native to North America where it is common in sedge meadows, marshes, and along streambanks and shores. The flower get its name Versicolor from the Greek word Rainbow, in allusion to the prismatic colors of the species. [End text from Wikipedia]

 

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